PAPERS Resources

AAR Annual Meeting
Denver, CO
November 17-20, 2018

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Critical Theory and Discourses on Religion Unit

Statement of Purpose: 

The Critical Theory and Discourses on Religion (CTDR) Unit offers an interdisciplinary and international forum for analytical scholars of religion to engage the intersection of critical theory and methodology with a focus on concrete ethnographic and historical case studies. Critical theory draws on methods employed in the fields of sociology, anthropology, history, literary criticism, and political theory in order to bring into scrutiny all kinds of discourses on religion, spanning from academic to nonacademic and from religious to nonreligious.

This Unit seeks to provide a forum in which scholars of religion from a wide range of disciplines can examine and question their disciplinary presuppositions. The work of this Unit can be placed under three main rubrics:

• Critical investigation of the categories generated and employed by the discourses on religion, such as experience, the sacred, ritual, and the various ‘isms’ that can be found in classic and contemporary studies of religion
• Analysis of new and neglected theorists and works central to the critical study of religion, including those produced in cognate fields such as anthropology, political science, or literary theory
• Theoretically-informed examination of elided and often neglected themes in religious studies, including class, race, gender, violence, legitimation, and the material basis of religion

Call for Papers: 

The CTDR group offers an interdisciplinary and international forum for analytical scholars of religion to engage the intersection of critical theory and methodology with a focus on concrete ethnographic and historical case studies. Critical theory draws on methods employed in the fields of sociology, anthropology, history, literary criticism, and political theory in order to bring into scrutiny all kinds of discourses on religion, spanning from academic to nonacademic and from religious to nonreligious.

This year we invite proposals on the following topics:

• The Legacy of Orientalism
On the 40th anniversary of Edward Said’s Orientalism, we invite reflections on its impact on and contemporary relevance for questions of periodization, power, geography, and canon in Religious Studies.

• Race, Racialization, and the Classed Rhetorics of White Supremacy

• Theorizing Appropriations, Syncretisms, Bricolage, and Related Terms in the Study of Religion
For 2018 we are also sponsoring an author-meets-critics session on Jessica Johnson’s new book, Biblical Porn: Affect, Labor, and Pastor Mark Driscoll's Evangelical Empire, for which we do not seek proposals.

Method: 
PAPERS
Process: 
Proposals are anonymous to chairs and steering committee members until after final acceptance/rejection
Leadership: 
ChairSteering Committee