PAPERS Resources

AAR Annual Meeting
San Diego, CA
November 23-26, 2019

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Program Book (PDF)

Preliminary Program Book (MS Word)

Floorplans of Annual Meeting Facilities (PDF)

Exhibit Hall Listing and Map (PDF)

Program Book Ads (PDF)

Annual Meeting At-A-Glance (PDF)

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Evangelical Studies Unit

Statement of Purpose: 

This Unit is one of a very few academic professional groups specifically created for the academic study of evangelical theology without a confessional requirement for membership or participation and that seeks to be diverse with regard to gender, denomination, ethnicity, and culture. The Unit seeks to construct sessions at each Annual Meeting that address crucial issues both within the evangelical communities of North America and the world and between evangelicals and non-evangelical religious movements and theologies. The Unit sponsors sessions with theological, historical, and/or sociological foci. The Unit’s goal has always been to stay on the “cutting edge” of evangelical thought and to cross boundaries between evangelical and non-evangelical religious communities in order to create dialogue and constructive mutual understanding.

Call for Papers: 

Theme for 2020: The Breadth of Evangelical Identities

Over the previous three years our unit has concentrated focused reflection on the definition and description of Evangelicalism with regards to its public posture, and its relationship to questions of race and ethnicity, the definition of the term “Evangelical,” and has complexified the conversation by exploring the movement’s varieties. We wish to continue to explore the breadth of Evangelical identities in ways that move into more complex descriptions and focus on the religious, political, and theological features of the movement.

As such we invite inquiries for panels or individual papers that focus attention on Evangelical varieties within a particular continent, including the identity and description of los evangélicos, or responses to the idea of Brown Church, and other new movements operating within and among the traditional Protestant/Catholic divide with new forms of embodiment and new theological and ethical emphases. Additionally, we are interested in the dynamic between languages of the church and the academy and how these enable and disable understandings of what Evangelicalism is, especially with regard to political engagement and newly formed alliances, projects, and organizations. We remain interested also in more constructive proposals that critically develop notions of evangelical intersectionality, especially as these might focus on regional distinctives of Evangelicalism in different places throughout the globe.

In addition to our allotted sessions, we are considering these co-sponsorships:

With AAR’s History of Christianity Unit and/or Pentecostalisms Unit, and/or Latino Religion Unit, we are considering engagement with new books by Robert Chao Romero’s Brown Church, Jonathan Calvillo’s Santa Ana Saints, and other works from scholars and movements working to complexify understandings of Evangelicalism.
With AAR’s Class, Religion, and Theology Unit we are also exploring the possibility of a roundtable discussion among panelists invited by a diverse group of units to respond to the 2020 US election.
With SBL’s Bible and Practical Theology Unit: “Evangelical, Biblical, and Political Views on the Election.”

Statement of Purpose:
This Group is one of a very few academic professional groups specifically created for the academic study of evangelical theology without a confessional requirement for membership or participation and that seeks to be diverse with regard to gender, denomination, ethnicity, and culture. The Group seeks to construct sessions at each Annual Meeting that address crucial issues both within the evangelical communities of North America and the world and between evangelicals and nonevangelical religious movements and theologies. The Group sponsors sessions with theological, historical, and/or sociological foci. The Group’s goal has always been to stay on the “cutting edge” of evangelical thought and to cross boundaries between evangelical and non-evangelical religious communities in order to create dialogue and constructive mutual understanding.

Method: 
PAPERS
E-mail without Attachment (proposal appears in body of e-mail)
Other
Other: 
In addition to our allotted sessions, we are considering these co-sponsorships: With AAR’s History of Christianity Unit and/or Pentecostalisms Unit, and/or Latino Religion Unit, we are considering engagement with new books by Robert Chao Romero’s Brown Church, Jonathan Calvillo’s Santa Ana Saints, and other works from scholars and movements working to complexify understandings of Evangelicalism. With AAR’s Class, Religion, and Theology Unit we are also exploring the possibility of a roundtable discussion among panelists invited by a diverse group of units to respond to the 2020 US election. With SBL’s Bible and Practical Theology Unit: “Evangelical, Biblical, and Political Views on the Election.”
Process: 
Proposer names are visible to chairs but anonymous to steering committee members
Comments: 
This assists in broadening the diversity of the participants, while allowing for selection of the best paper proposals without partiality. It is not ideal, but presently helpful - especially since Evangelical Studies remains a bit more strongly represented by white males, and we are trying to get better with this.
Leadership: 
ChairSteering Committee