PAPERS Resources

AAR Annual Meeting
San Diego, CA
November 23-26, 2019

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Program Book (PDF)

Preliminary Program Book (MS Word)

Floorplans of Annual Meeting Facilities (PDF)

Exhibit Hall Listing and Map (PDF)

Program Book Ads (PDF)

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Psychology, Culture, and Religion Unit

Statement of Purpose: 

The PCR unit is comprised of scholars and practitioners in the fields of psychology, religious studies, and cultural analysis. The interests of our members range from Freudian and Jungian psychoanalysis to the practice of pastoral counseling, from object relations theory to cultural studies of trauma and healing. Our primary purposes are to foster creative research, encourage the exchange of ideas among the membership, and provide a forum within the AAR for people with shared backgrounds in the interdisciplinary study of psychology, religion, and culture. Please visit our Website at http://pcr-aar.org/ and join the PCR listserv at http://aarlists.org/listinfo/psychculturereligion

Call for Papers: 

The PCR Unit is comprised of scholars and practitioners in the fields of psychology, religious studies, and cultural analysis. The interests of our members range from Freudian and Jungian psychoanalysis to the practice of pastoral counseling, from object relations theory to cultural studies of trauma and healing. Our primary purposes are to foster creative research, encourage the exchange of ideas among the membership, and provide a forum within the AAR for people with shared backgrounds in the interdisciplinary study of psychology, religion, and culture.

● Psychological Interiority of Resistance -
This session explores the psychological dynamics, personal, professional, and social consequences that instructors and professors at all career stages experience when they address contested topics through teaching, research, and public engagement. We invite submissions that explore the inner experience and social consequences of engaging race, class, gender, sexuality, etc. in the classroom and beyond, especially when these perspectives may prove threatening, compromising, or hold social and political implications for the scholar. For example, what happens when a scholar who identifies as a racial/ ethnic/ sexual/ political/ ideological minority expresses their commitments in an institutional culture that is overwhelmingly opposed to these views? What is the resulting social experience? What is at stake psychologically, and what internal/external resources sustain teachers and scholars in their resolve? We are interested in papers that prioritize personal experience in conversation with religious and psychological theories and frameworks.

● Experimental Session on Psychologies of Religions: Decentering Christian and Jewish Models of Psychological Wellness -
In the fields of psychology and religion, pastoral counseling, and spiritual care, Christian and Jewish paradigms of psychological illness and well-being have long dominated the discussion. This session seeks to foster a conversation that de-centers these dominant frames to explore notion of psychological (emotional, cognitive, behavioral, relational, communal) illness and wellness from the perspective of Hindu, Baha’i, Islamic, Buddhist, Jain, Aboriginal, and other religious frameworks.

● Climate Change Denial: How Religious & Psychological Perspectives May Expand Understanding and Foster Change -
Americans remain polarized in their attitudes about global climate change. As many as 40% still deny its reality. Professional organizations in both religion and psychology are taking steps to understand and mitigate the problem of “climate change denial” that continues despite nearly universal scientific consensus on the problem. For more than 30 years theologians and scholars of religion have sustained a body of work on ecology and religion, work that explores the religious understandings of natural and built worlds. More recently psychological organizations and theorists in the Americas and Australia have taken up psychological questions about global climate change exploring risks, interpersonal and intergroup behaviors, psychological barriers, and coping mechanisms, among other topics. This call invites papers that explore the intersection of psychology and religion as they inform understandings of the endurance of climate change itself, explore the religious and psychological commitments that persist in denial of global climate change, and/or offer solutions for fostering healing and change for the planet and its inhabitants.

Method: 
PAPERS
Process: 
Proposals are anonymous to chairs and steering committee members during review, but visible to chairs prior to final acceptance or rejection
Comments: 
Throughout the review process we keep all submissions blind to all reviewers and chairs. Only when the reviews are in do the chairs begin to reveal names and institutions. As I recall, we had to re-set the controls in one of the co-sponsored calls this year, but it was quickly managed.
Leadership: 
ChairSteering Committee