PAPERS Resources

AAR Annual Meeting
San Diego, CA
November 23-26, 2019

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Program Book (PDF)

Preliminary Program Book (MS Word)

Floorplans of Annual Meeting Facilities (PDF)

Exhibit Hall Listing and Map (PDF)

Program Book Ads (PDF)

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Religion and Food Unit

Statement of Purpose: 

This Unit provides an opportunity for scholars to engage in the intersection of religion and food, foodways, and food ethics. We are interested in examining these topics across broad geographical areas, religious traditions, and historical eras. We encourage critical reflection regarding:

• The relationships of religious commitments to food (production, preparation, consumption, and invention)
• Diet and sustainability
• Issues of food (in)justice, which may include food availability or insecurity, commitment to wellness, access to healthy foods, food deserts, etc.
• Desertification, flood, fire, and climate related food ethics issues
• Theological, spiritual, and religious interrelationships as expressed in food commitments or confluence
• The cross-cultural applicability of the categories of “religion” and “food” themselves

We seek to develop ongoing investigations into practices and beliefs related to food, drink, fasting, the production of food, the ethics of production and consumption, or on any aspect of religiously influenced foodways.

Call for Papers: 

The Religion and Food Unit provides an opportunity for scholars to engage in the intersection of religion and food, foodways, and food ethics. We are interested in examining these topics across broad geographical areas, religious traditions, and historical eras. We seek papers investigating practices and beliefs related to food, drink, fasting, the production of food, the ethics of production and consumption, or on any aspect of religiously influenced foodways.
Topics might include, but are not limited to the following:

● We are accepting proposals for a session considering borderlands and their implications for religious and culinary practices.

● We will consider proposals dealing with broad dynamics related to migration. Papers may give special attention to 1) the broad implications and dynamics of “carrying” food and religion north, from Mexico, or 2) west, from the U.S. South or Midwest, with attention to the significance of directionality.

● We are interested in papers considering interfacing topics such as 1) chefs as scholars or activists; 2) food tourism and culture (representation and adventuring); 3) Migrant Kitchens; or 4) cohering diaspora communities through food.

● We welcome proposals that encourage thinking about the way food is visualized and represented in community and culture, placing emphasis on 1) concepts of culinary heritage; 2) notions of particular foods as heritage; or 3) the restoration of indigenous foodways and how any of these overlap with space and time.

● We are interested in proposals that give attention to food as amusement, which could include surfing culture or music.

Co-sponsored sessions:

● For a possible co-sponsored session between the Religion and Food Unit and the Body and Religion Unit, proposals engaging studies of religion and food that pay particular attention to 1) the human bodily practices of eating, drinking, or abstaining; or 2) the consumption of nonhuman-animal bodies by human bodies.

● For a possible tri-sponsored session between the Religion and Food Unit, the Class, Religion, and Theology Unit, and the Latina/o Religion, Culture, and Society Unit, we solicit papers that analyze religion, social class, and the food-chain. Paper topics may include food-chain labor; food ecologies; theological meanings of food labor; food injustice; Latinx food culture/religiosity; the ghettoization, ethnicization, and/or genderization of food labor spaces; and other relevant topics.

● For a possible co-sponsored session between the Religion and Food Unit and the Women of Color Scholarship, Teaching and Activism Unit we invite papers that explore of how the work of women of color (as scholars, teachers and activists) in public spaces impacts the private spaces and lives of women. We envision broad engagement between activists, scholar-practitioners, theologians and religious scholars. Submissions may engage, but are not limited to, the following issues:

○ The work of women of color in communities facing food injustice and/or insecurity
○ The historical significance of women of color engaging in cooperative activist work (e.g., Dorothy Height’s support of Fannie Lou Hamer’s pig banking project)
○ Fannie Lou Hamer’s work with the Freedom Farms Cooperative and its lasting effects on the struggle for civil rights and/or later social justice work
○ The type(s) of strategies generated by women of color who work “in the dirt” - in farming/food spaces - as well as academic spaces
○ The ways issues of food, environmental, and eco-activism shape practices for teachers, inside and outside the classroom
○ How women of color mobilize spiritual resources, interfaith networks, and spiritual activism as means of addressing food justice

Method: 
PAPERS
Process: 
Proposer names are visible to chairs but anonymous to steering committee members
Leadership: 
ChairSteering Committee