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Online Program Book

In-person sessions begin with an A-prefix (i.e., A20-102), whereas Virtual sessions begin with an AV-prefix (i.e., AV20-102)
All Times are Listed in Central Standard Time (CST)

M19-403

Theme: The Philosophical Qoheleth: Two visions of Ecclesiastes and its centrality in Philosophy of Religion

Friday, 6:00 PM-7:00 PM (In Person)

Grand Hyatt-Bowie C

The Philosophical Qoheleth: Two visions of Ecclesiastes and its centrality in Philosophy of
Religion

Ecclesiastes has always presented itself as an enigmatic book in the Hebrew Bible. In what Catholic scholar Peter Kreeft called “the greatest of all books of philosophy,” it seems to lend itself to varied interpretations and possibilities. What lasting impact has Qoheleth had in developing a scriptural anthropology and an understanding of God? In what ways does Ecclesiastes anticipate and answer the conditions of modernity in alienation, confusion, estrangement, and anomie? How are we to read and interpret its central theme? The Panel seeks to answer these questions and engage the audience in two rich philosophical understandings of the book.

Moderator: David Mau, Colorado Christian University

Panelists:
Doug Groothuis, Denver Seminary
Knut Heim, Denver Seminary

M19-501

Theme: Job: A Philosophical Commentary, by Owen Anderson

Friday, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM (In Person)

Grand Hyatt-Bowie C

Job: A Philosophical Commentary by Owen Anderson

Owen Anderson's new book Job: A Philosophical Commentary looks at Job as the first philosopher who confronts the first question of philosophy. This is the problem of meaning. As Job struggles to make sense of the world and his belief in God, his own integrity is challenged. Each of the philosophers included on this panel have done work on the problem of evil and suffering and will bring their own useful perspectives to this discussion. The questions will include: in what way does Job anticipate later articulations of the problem of evil? What are the various solutions found in the book and how can Christians benefit from a reading of Job? What is the role of natural theology in Job?

Moderator: Owen Anderson, Arizona State University

Panelists:
Doug Groothuis, Denver Seminary
Dan Bonevac, UT Austin
Michael Plato Colorado Christian University

M20-404

Theme: Analytic Christology and the Theological Interpretation of the New Testament, by Thomas McCall

Saturday, 6:30 PM-8:00 PM (In Person)

Marriott Rivercenter-Conference 14

A recent contribution to the Oxford Studies in Analytic Theology, Thomas McCall’s Analytic Christology and the Theological Interpretation of the New Testament (OUP: 2021) addresses concerns with analytic theology’s being a niche movement. First, he brings recent developments in New Testament scholarship, particularly Pauline studies, and recent developments in analytic philosophy into conversation. Second, he philosophically and exegetically analyzes trends in contemporary Christology. For both of these goals, McCall draws upon traditional theological insights that are often overlooked or misunderstood. With this book, McCall advances analytic theology toward a more integrative mode. The panelists represent distinct disciplines, bringing unique perspectives to McCall’s book.

Moderator: Kevin Wong [5 mins].

Thomas McCall, Asbury Theological Seminary [12 mins.]
Amy Peeler, Wheaton College [12 mins.]
Stephen Davis, Claremont McKenna College [12 mins.]
John Peckham, Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary [12 mins.]

Response by McCall [15–20 mins.]
Q/A between panelists and audience [remaining time; total time: 90 mins.]"

M20-514

Theme: Love Divine: A Systematic Account of Gods Love for Humanity, by Jordan Wessling

Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:30 PM (In Person)

Marriott Rivercenter-Conference 14

A recent contribution to the Oxford Studies in Analytic Theology, Jordan Wessling’s Love Divine: A Systematic Account of God’s Love for Humanity (OUP: 2020) analyzes a divine attribute that has not received as much scholarly interest as other divine attributes: God’s love. Wessling draws from contemporary theology and philosophy yet remains grounded in Christian tradition. Further, his analysis of divine love interfaces with a wide array of other doctrines that are of theological and philosophical interest, such as the atonement, divine simplicity, and divine passibility. Further, he theorizes new models that challenge long-held Christian commitments, such as limited atonement.
The scholars who have committed to participating on the panel represent distinct and unique perspectives to Wessling’s book, from a Barthian systematic theologian to an analytic philosopher to an analytic theologian.

M21-404

Theme: Panel discussion of God, Morality, and Beauty: The Trinitarian Shape of Christian Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Problem of Evil, by Randall Bush

Sunday, 6:30 PM-8:00 PM (In Person)

Hyatt Regency-Medina

The book being discussed entails a wide-ranging investigation that assesses various approaches to philosophical methodology, ethics, aesthetics, psychology, sociology, literature, hermeneutical philosophy, narrative theology, the problem of evil, and Christian theology. The author argues that a Trinitarian vision offers the most satisfactory, far-reaching rationale for addressing proximate and ultimate questions pertaining to the philosophy of value. Panel participants will present papers evaluating selected topics covered in the book.

M21-513

Theme: The Films of Paul Schrader

Sunday, 8:00 PM-9:30 PM (In Person)

Hyatt Regency-Medina

The Films of Paul Schrader

Throughout his career writer/director Paul Schrader has created some of the most theologically and philosophically rich films in American cinema. This panel will explore his work with an eye to articulating Schrader’s views on Christian community, authenticity and faith, hope and despair, and fallenness.

Panelists:

Phil Tallon, Houston Baptist University

Jeff Green, Houston Baptist University

Bearden Coleman, Houston Baptist University