You are here

Online Program Book

In-person sessions begin with an A-prefix (i.e., A20-102), whereas Virtual sessions begin with an AV-prefix (i.e., AV20-102)
All Times are Listed in Central Standard Time (CST)

PV19-231

Theme: Annual Lecture

Friday, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM (Virtual)

In T.F. Torrance’s trinitarian theology, the homoousion plays the role that the doctrine of divine simplicity played for the pro-Nicene theologians in the fourth century. This lecture will demonstrate that point, and then consider the historical and systematic implications of it. It is arguable that Torrance offers us a way to preserve trinitarian orthodoxy without the need to invoke the troublesome concept of simplicity, which would be a significant gain; it is also arguable that even in Torrance’s deployment, the homoousion is too capacious of doctrines the Fathers would have regarded as tritheistic.

  • Abstract

    In T.F. Torrance’s trinitarian theology, the homoousion plays the role that the doctrine of divine simplicity played for the pro-Nicene theologians in the fourth century. This lecture will demonstrate that point, and then consider the historical and systematic implications of it. It is arguable that Torrance offers us a way to preserve trinitarian orthodoxy without the need to invoke the troublesome concept of simplicity, which would be a significant gain; it is also arguable that even in Torrance’s deployment, the homoousion is too capacious of doctrines the Fathers would have regarded as tritheistic.

AV19-302

Theme: Whose Rooster? A Roundtable on Thoreau, Melville, and Transcendentalist Environmental Politics

Friday, 3:00 PM-4:30 PM (Virtual)

This roundtable on Transcendentalist environmentalism considers ideas of health in nature and the ways in which human and natural flourishing are interconnected; how the health of human communities is tied up with the health of nature, and vice versa. Our conversation will bring out the political dimensions of aesthetic encounters in the appreciation of natural beauty and seeks to retrieve the insights of Transcendentalist figures for our time, in our current environmental predicament. The panel will focus on the figures of Henry David Thoreau and Herman Melville, who each inhabited the landscape of Massachusetts. Although Melville is not typically counted among the Transcendentalists, he is roughly contemporary with the movement, and his work often engages Transcendentalist themes and thinkers, Thoreau in particular. This roundtable will sharpen Thoreau and Melville’s contrasting positions, force us to reconsider oversimplified characterizations of these thinkers, and constructively extend their dialogue to speak to the pressing environmental issues of our day. Short presentations will be followed by an energetic dialogue among the panelists and the audience.